THE CAUCASIAN CHALK CIRCLE

CHARACTER AND CHARACTERISATION

AZDAK

Mansfield_Old
AZDAK AT WORK (Photo Courtesy of mansfield)

Azdak was a village scrivener. He housed the Grand duke masquerading as beggar. He thought that the beggar was a genuine one. After realizing what he had done, he detains himself and commands Shauwa to take him to Nuka for trial. While in Nuka, he ends up being appointed as a judge after the reigning judge was killed by the carpet weavers. Azdak is loved by the peasantry for how he executes justice. However, the rich, who have always known justice, are not happy with how justice is passed.

CHARACTER TRAITS

Shrewd/cunning/insightful

Azdak steals the Fat Prince’s rabbits and when asked, he says that the rabbits are weed eaters and must be exterminated (pg65).

He furthermore teaches the Grand duke on how to eat like a beggar, and not like a landowner. Moreover, he detains himself for housing the Grand duke.

Azdak also takes bribes openly and gives a verdict according to what he believes in. He runs the system according to the existing status quo but administers justice in a manner that is contrary to the expectation of the rich and powerful.

Intelligent/Wise/learned/witty

He knows he has the right on his side that is why he takes the Fat Prince’s rabbits knowing fully well that no harm shall come to him.

He knows the history of wars and narrates to the Ironshirts what happened in Persia.

He operates as the village scrivener because he knew how to read and write. The whole village depended on him because of his writing skills.

In his witticism he stages a mock trial in order to evaluate the new Judge Prince Kazbeki had appointed. Knowing fully well that it was just a mock trial, he spills the beans on the corruption that was surrounding the ongoing war. He accuses the princes for swindling the money that was meant to buy provisions for the war and many other vices.

Honest/law-abiding/humane/considerate/patriot

Azdak shows his honesty by detaining himself and confessing his sins. He is ready to accept his punishment however, he learns that the judge had just been assassinated by the rioting carpet weavers.

He does not keep the truth from coming out. He accuses the princes for pilfering war resources. (pg74).

Azdak has the heart to offer the beggar some food and a place to sleep. He also weighs the situation and considers that it would be safer to not let Shauwa know about the the beggar in his house.

Brave/courageous/outspoken

He showcases his bravery by crossing the boundaries. While other people are afraid of getting into the Fat Prince’s farm, he goes on to even steal the rabbits belonging to the Fat Prince.

He is not afraid to say the things he says before the Fat Prince. Despite knowing how grave the accusations are, Azdak goes ahead and accuses the princes for benefitting from the war.

The Ironshirts are awed by the way Azdak speaks, they ask him whether he knows what was really going around (pg70).

Level-headed/incorrigible/just/accommodating/kind-hearted/open-minded/humble

No other judge in Grusinia was a great as Azdak. Despite the fact that he spent more time drinking than solving the cases, Azdak displays a maturity that had never been seen before. Regardless of the fact that he sits on the book of law, he has reason to salvage the remaining dignity of natural justice and bring justice to the town which aristocracy had been the major decision maker.

He humbles himself before the Granny Grusinia and offers her a chair to sit own while he, a whole judge sits on the ground. Despite the heavy corruption surrounding him, Azdak manages to at least see through the lies of the mighty and rich to steal justice from the innocent peasant who suffered under heavy taxes and brutal aristocratic hand.

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