NEPOTISM IN THE BETRAYAL IN THE CITY EXPLAINED

NEPOTISM IS RIFE IN ONE’S SOCIETY, DEBATE ON THIS ALLEGATION GIVING EVIDENCE FROM THE PLAY BETRAYAL IN THE CITY, a play by Francis Imbuga

In African continent, nepotism is not exactly a vice but the order of the day. Those in leadership have made it an order of the day to award cronies and close relatives with job appointments with little regard to professionalism and national interest.

Mulili fondly refers to Boss as his cousin he is unashamed to brandish the closeness he shares with boss. He rubs it in to people that Boss is related to him. In fact Mulili thinks that he is untouchable given how close he is to Boss.

On the other hand, Boss awards Mulili with a piece of land where Mulili carries farming activities. Despite the fact that Mulili has retired from the military, Boss is unashamed of making him the right hand man, that is, the advisor to Boss’s administration. Mulili is literally omnipresent in every committee and everything that takes place in Kafira.

Mulili’s education notwithstanding, he relishes unmatched opportunities in government. He has no constructive knowledge in the affairs of running the government but, he ends up being among the top people in Kafira’s administration

When confronted with his educational achievements by Kabito, Mulili plants verbal evidence against Kabito. Kabito ends up dead but nothing can be done against him. This shows the privileges Boss’ confidants enjoy.

Nepotism hinders progress in the African society given that, as illustrated in the play. Most tenders go towards the cronies and the relations of those in power. Mulili wins the milk tender after it had already been awarded to Kabito.

In further examples, planting close relatives within the committees hinders proactive decision making since majority fear losing their positions and being thrown into the dungeon as what happened to Jere who had opposed Boss’s directive.

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